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American Academy of Pediatrics

Protecting Your Child With the COVID-19 Vaccine

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The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends COVID-19 vaccines for all eligible children 5 years and older.

Millions of kids and teens already have been safely vaccinated.

Why get vaccinated?

Vaccination protects your child from becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID. The vaccine was found to be 90.7% effective in children ages 5-11 and 100% effective in children ages 12- 15.

Is the vaccine safe?

The COVID-19 vaccine is remarkably effective and safe. About 8.7 million children ages 5-11 have safely had at least one dose. The vaccines are continuously monitored for safety

Are there side effects?

Just like with every vaccine your child has received, they may have mild, temporary side effects like fatigue, chills or a headache. Some children have no vaccine side effects.

What is the dosage?

Children under 18 years of age receive two doses, 21 days apart, with a dose approved for their age. Kids 12 and older should get a booster at least five months after the second dose.

What if my child already had COVID?

Children who have recovered from COVID should still get vaccinated. It is unknown how long your child's immunity will last, and the vaccine will strengthen their immune response to variants.

Still have questions?

Ask your pediatrician. We are here to answer your questions and help you with your decision.

Disclaimer

Source: COVID-19 Vaccine Campaign Toolkit

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is an organization of 67,000 primary care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists, and pediatric surgical specialists dedicated to the health, safety, and well-being of all infants, children, adolescents, and young adults.

In all aspects of its publishing program (writing, review, and production), the AAP is committed to promoting principles of equity, diversity, and inclusion.

The information contained in this publication should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

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